DRIVING UNDER SUSPENSION AND AN OUTSTANDING WARRANT

Another way to earn an Ohio license suspension is to have an outstanding warrant. You can find this suspension at Ohio Revised Code Section 4503.13. What is unique about this suspension is that it is not really a suspension, but a block.  A municipal court can send a report to the Ohio BMV that an arrest warrant has been issued.  Upon the bureau’s receipt of this information, the Bureau of Motor Vehicles (BMV) will deny the person named in the arrest warrant the right to apply for a driver license or vehicle registration.  Because of the nature of the warrant block, it lasts until it is remedied.  To reinstate following a warrant block, the BMV must be notified by the court that all outstanding arrest warrants have been satisfied. Effective September 16, 2004, House Bill 230 requires a reinstatement fee to cover BMV administrative costs.

DrivingUnder Suspension in Ohio is a First Degree Misdemeanor that carries a maximum six (6) month jail sentence and a potential $1,000.00 fine.  A serious offense requires a serious attorney.  I have been fighting driving under suspension charges for over sixteen years.  I will get  you back on the road with a valid Ohio driver’s license. I will do everything possible to protect you from additional license suspensions, excessive fines and jail time.  By fighting hard in the courtroom and negotiating intelligently outside of it, we work to avoid a conviction or mitigate the worst provisions of this charge.  Contact me at (937) 879-9542. I practice in Dayton, Springfield, Xenia, Miamisburg, Beavercreek, Vandalia, Huber Heights, Fairborn and I appear in all courts throughout the Miami Valley.

UNDERAGE CONSUMPTION CHARGE IN OHIO

Underage possession or consumption of beer or intoxicants is a serious crime in Ohio. The charges are first-degree misdemeanors carrying a maximum penalty of 180 days in jail and up to a $1,000.00 fine. Worse yet, a conviction may leave you with a “criminal record” which is much more serious than a fine or costs. Fear, shame or guilt may compel you to want to plead guilty to put the charge behind you, but that decision may have long-lasting and unintended consequences.

If you are under 21 years old, drinking alcohol is illegal in the State of Ohio. Ohio Revised Code 4301.69(E)(1) provides that “No underage person shall knowingly order, pay for, share the cost of, attempt to purchase, possess, or consume any beer or intoxicating liquor in any public or private place. No underage person shall knowingly be under the influence of any beer or intoxicating liquor in any public place.”

DRIVING UNDER SUSPENSION IN OHIO

Another way to earn an Ohio license suspension is to have an outstanding warrant. You can find this suspension at Ohio Revised Code Section 4503.13. What is unique about this suspension is that it is not really a suspension, but a block.  A municipal court can send a report to the Ohio BMV that an arrest warrant has been issued.  Upon the bureau’s receipt of this information, the Bureau of Motor Vehicles (BMV) will deny the person named in the arrest warrant the right to apply for a driver license or vehicle registration.  Because of the nature of the warrant block, it lasts until it is remedied.  To reinstate following a warrant block, the BMV must be notified by the court that all outstanding arrest warrants have been satisfied. Effective September 16, 2004, House Bill 230 requires a reinstatement fee to cover BMV administrative costs.

DrivingUnder Suspension in Ohio is a First Degree Misdemeanor that carries a maximum six (6) month jail sentence and a potential $1,000.00 fine.  A serious offense requires a serious attorney.  I have been fighting driving under suspension charges for over sixteen years.  I will get  you back on the road with a valid Ohio driver’s license. I will do everything possible to protect you from additional license suspensions, excessive fines and jail time.  By fighting hard in the courtroom and negotiating intelligently outside of it, we work to avoid a conviction or mitigate the worst provisions of this charge.  Contact me at (937) 879-9542. I practice in Dayton, Springfield, Xenia, Miamisburg, Beavercreek, Vandalia, Huber Heights, Fairborn and I appear in all courts throughout the Miami Valley.

Assault Cases

Under Ohio law (Ohio Revised Code section 2903.13), the crime of Assault occurs when a person knowingly causes or attempts to  cause physical harm to another or to another’s unborn.  Assault also occurs where a person recklessly causes serious physical injury.

Generally Assault is a first degree misdemeanor (punishable by up to six months jail and a $1000 fine).  Certain aggravating factors can bump a simple assault charge from a misdemeanor to a felony (if the other person is a law enforcement officer, for example).

If you are accused of Assault in the Dayton area, contact attorney Mark Babb at 937-318-1387 to discuss your case and set up a free consultation.  Mark is an experienced criminal defense attorney who has helped many people avoid assault convictions.

Drinking Underage in the Miami Valley

Underage possession or consumption of beer or intoxicants is a serious crime in Ohio. The charges are first-degree misdemeanors carrying a maximum penalty of 180 days in jail and up to a $1,000.00 fine. Worse yet, a conviction may leave you with a “criminal record” which is much more serious than a fine or costs. Fear, shame or guilt may compel you to want to plead guilty to put the charge behind you, but that decision may have long-lasting and unintended consequences.

If you are under 21 years old, drinking alcohol is illegal in the State of Ohio. Ohio Revised Code 4301.69(E)(1) provides that “No underage person shall knowingly order, pay for, share the cost of, attempt to purchase, possess, or consume any beer or intoxicating liquor in any public or private place. No underage person shall knowingly be under the influence of any beer or intoxicating liquor in any public place.”